about_bg
slider-right-arrow
The London Thyroid & ENT Clinic
Home > The Thyroid

The Thyroid

 

slider-right-arrow

The Thyroid Gland and its Function

The thyroid gland makes hormones, which are released into the blood stream. These hormones are chemical messengers that affect other parts of the body.

The gland itself is made up of two lobes, in shape it resembles a cross between a bow tie and a butterfly. One lobe lies on each side of the wind pipe (trachea); the lobes are joined by a ridge of thyroid tissue called the isthmus, a little like the middle of the bow tie or the body of the butterfly. The thyroid sits just below the Adam’s Apple (the thyroid cartilage).

The thyroid gland is regulated by the pituitary gland, which sits at the base of the brain. If the level of thyroid hormone drops, the pituitary gland produces thyroid stimulating hormone, known as TSH. This stimulates the thyroid gland to increase the production of thyroid hormones. If the levels of thyroid hormones are too high, the pituitary attempts to decrease production by shutting off the TSH.

request an appointment

The Parathyroid Glands and their Function

Attached to the thyroid gland are the parathyroid glands, normally four in number. These little glands are usually the size of a split pea and produce parathyroid hormone (PTH). This is important for regulating the calcium concentration in the blood. Calcium is essential for healthy teeth, bones and normal muscle function, as well as for general well being.

request an appointment

The Recurrent Laryngeal Nerves

At the back of the thyroid gland are the recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLNs), one on either side. These supply the voice box and may be bruised or, very rarely, damaged during the surgery.

Thyroid Gland Illustration
request an appointment

Make An Enquiry

Please fill in the form below

widget
widget

Opening Times